La construction du 3e porte-avions chinois serait déjà bien avancée

  • Auteur de la discussion Orang Malang
  • Date de début
ChrisHK

ChrisHK

Alpha & Oméga
27 Déc 2013
14 283
11 181
178
Hong Kong et Shanghai
lafoy-china

lafoy-china

Modo en rolls
Membre du personnel
08 Mar 2009
16 096
8 348
198
Hong-Kong - Dongguan - Beijing - Paris -
Les porte-avions ont eu leur moment de gloire dans le Pacifique dans les annees 40-50. C'etait une epoque ou il n'y avait pas de missiles et ou les guerres etaient assymetriques (le Vietnam par exemple n'avait pas ed PA). Aujourd'hui on contemple des guerres entre grande-puissances avec missiles hypersoniques voire nucleaires. Le PA font figure de dinosaures dans de tels affrontements.
Beyond The Ford: Navy Studies Next-Gen Carriers By Paul McLeary
March 05, 2020

CVN-78-Gerald-Ford-nuclear-carrier-under-construction-in-Newport-News-19089.jpg
The $13 billion USS Ford under construction in Newport News, Va.

The Future Carrier 2030 Task Force, which the service will announce next week, will study how carriers stack up against new generations of stealthy submarines and long-range precision weapons being fielded by China and Russia.

Article : WASHINGTON: The Navy is launching a deep dive into the future of its aircraft carrier fleet, Breaking Defense has learned, even as the Secretary of Defense, dissatisfied with current Navy plans, conducts his own assessment. The two studies clearly show the deepening concern over how China’s growing might and the Pentagon’s eroding budgets could affect the iconic, expensive supercarriers.
The Future Carrier 2030 Task Force, which the service plans to announce next week, will take six months to study how carriers stack up against new generations of stealthy submarines and long-range precision weapons being fielded by China and Russia. It comes at a fraught moment time for the fleet, as Defense Secretary Mark Esper has taken personal ownership over the service’s force planning while publicly lambast

Two sources familiar with the planning said the effort is focused on threats in 2030 and beyond — which, given the years it takes to design, develop, and build new classes of ships, could affect budget decisions in the fairly near future. The study could have major implications on how the Navy designs and builds carriers, the sources agreed.
The study will also have to account for knock-on effects on the work shipbuilders would get in the future, which is always a politically-charged issue. For decades, Newport News in Virginia — now owned by Huntington Ingalls Industries — has been the only shipyard in the world capable of constructing a nuclear-powered supercarrier. The yard is currently under contract for the four new Ford-class carriers, worth tens of billions of dollars, which are slated to enter the fleet in the coming decade.

The Future Carrier 2030 Task Force is being put together by Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly, who expects a report back in about 180 days.

Modly’s task force study, however, will run in parallel with work already being done on the Navy’s future force structure by Deputy Defense Secretary David Norquist. Sec. Esper recently ordered his deputy to review both the Navy’s 30 year shipbuilding plan and its highly-anticipated modernization plan after Esper was unsatisfied with the plans the Navy offered him. The secretary said last week in a letter to the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee he expects the relook to wrap up by summer.
These two parallel — and to some extent competing — studies make Modly’s timeline tricky. His task force won’t wrap up until after the Pentagon’s reviews are done, and Modly will likely have left the secretary’s chair. The White House nominated Amb. Kenneth Braithwaite to be Navy Secretary last week, but it’s unclear when his confirmation hearing will be held.
Modly hinted at his study this morning during testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee. “We have a duty to look at what will come after the Ford,” he said, adding that the Navy has “some breathing room” before having to decide what comes after that last Ford is built in 2032.

Modly’s testimony, taken with similar recent comments about capping the Ford carriers at four before moving in a new direction, could signal a major shift in the Navy’s thinking. “I don’t know if we’re going to buy any more of that type,” Modly said in an interview published on March 4. “We’re certainly thinking about possible other classes. What are we going to learn on these four that’s going to inform what we do next?”
Back in January, he voiced similar concerns with the size and design of the current carrier fleet at a Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments event. “The big question, I think at the top of the list, is the carrier and what’s the future going to look like…I think we agree with a lot of conclusions that [carriers are] more vulnerable.”
For decades, American aircraft carrier strike groups, led by massive big decks bristling with fighter planes and surveillance aircraft, have been the key to US power projection.
But with new generations of long-range precision weapons that can smack into a carrier from well beyond the horizon, military planners have started rethinking the risks of putting a 100,000-ton supercarrier anywhere near a contested coastline.
“The Navy is realizing they need to change that approach and perhaps think about using carriers in more peripheral ways in a fight,” Bryan Clark, senior fellow at Hudson Institute, said. Instead of launching aircraft for strike missions deep inland, as they’ve been used in Iraq and Afghanistan, they’re more likely to “hang out out of range and do sea control,” covering down on large swaths of ocean.

In February, the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower performed just such a mission, sweeping a path across the Atlantic for cargo ships full of Army equipment bound for major ground exercise in Europe. The expercise, run under the newly reconstituted 2nd Fleet, was the first drill simulating a contested crossing of the Atlantic since 1986.
The Ike, along with an unidentified submarine sweeping the depths of the ocean for unexpected Russian guests, sailed well ahead of the convoy while fighting off simulated electronic warfare and undersea and aerial attacks in a stress test for how prepared the Navy is to punch its way across the Atlantic.
As the Pentagon and Navy hash out what the Navy of the future should look like to meet challenges posed by China, they are experimenting everywhere. Navy and Marine Corps leadership have warmed to the “lightning carrier” concept, designed to pack amphibious ships with Marine Corps’ F-35Bs and sail them to the hotspots to cover places the big decks aren’t.

Late last year, the USS America photographed in the Pacific with 13 F-35s on its deck, something the services want to do more of as the so-called Gator Navy reinforces more decks to handle the fifth generation fighter. The Marines and Navy are working on a new strategy to more closely align their operations, which would allow both to provide more punch, and give the Marines the ability to launch from both ships and from small ad-hoc land bases to support the fleet.
Any potentially smaller carrier of the future will not be as small as an amphibious ship, as those ships can’t support high sortie rates over long periods of time like a Nimitz or Ford carrier. They would, however, certainly be smaller than the hulking Fords.
Before the carrier fleet can be reshaped, however, the Navy and secretary Esper need to agree on a new modernization plan and a new shipbuilding plan. Those will come along with what is likely to be a new Navy secretary and then taken up with Congress, which has already mandated the Navy have a 12 carriers, a requirement the 11-carrier fleet has been unable to meet.

 
Naxshe

Naxshe

Dieu Supérieur
05 Jan 2016
1 178
632
138
31
Les missiles hypersoniques resteront des armes de dissuasions utilisees en cas de conflit ultime et irreversible ( premice guerre mondiale ) ! Quelle nation prendrait le risque de couler un porte avion a propulsion nucleaire , avec 4800 membres d'equipage a bord dans des operations ou des conflits secondaires ? personne ! Ce sont les clefs de la boite de Pandore ...
Le porte avion accompagne de son escadre est toujours la force de projection essentielle , tout du moins pour l'instant et je pense pour les 30 ans qui suivent !


Vous avez raisons, et c'est pour cela que nous connaissons leur existence, pour dissuader.

Je pense que beaucoup d'armement next gen sont tenu au secret et les US ont je pense une avance confortable la dedans. Pourquoi ? Parce qu'il vendent et font des guerres.

Lors de l'assassinat de Ben Laden, l'un des Blackhawk qui transportais les seal c'est crashé dans le jardin de la maison de Ben Laden, les témoins ont raconté qu'ils n'ont entendu que le crash. Les pièces du Blackhawk détruit on donné des spéculations quand à sont design dans les deux films parus sur cet opération, mais une chose est sur, ces hélicoptères étaient équipés de matériels qui les rendaient silencieux. Et cela a été une sacré nouvelle pour les autres armées.
 
ChrisHK

ChrisHK

Alpha & Oméga
27 Déc 2013
14 283
11 181
178
Hong Kong et Shanghai
G

guillaumeenchine

Membre Platinum
09 Sept 2019
1 287
227
73
45
Beyond The Ford: Navy Studies Next-Gen Carriers By Paul McLeary
March 05, 2020

Voir la pièce jointe 113396
The $13 billion USS Ford under construction in Newport News, Va.

The Future Carrier 2030 Task Force, which the service will announce next week, will study how carriers stack up against new generations of stealthy submarines and long-range precision weapons being fielded by China and Russia.

Article : WASHINGTON: The Navy is launching a deep dive into the future of its aircraft carrier fleet, Breaking Defense has learned, even as the Secretary of Defense, dissatisfied with current Navy plans, conducts his own assessment. The two studies clearly show the deepening concern over how China’s growing might and the Pentagon’s eroding budgets could affect the iconic, expensive supercarriers.
The Future Carrier 2030 Task Force, which the service plans to announce next week, will take six months to study how carriers stack up against new generations of stealthy submarines and long-range precision weapons being fielded by China and Russia. It comes at a fraught moment time for the fleet, as Defense Secretary Mark Esper has taken personal ownership over the service’s force planning while publicly lambast

Two sources familiar with the planning said the effort is focused on threats in 2030 and beyond — which, given the years it takes to design, develop, and build new classes of ships, could affect budget decisions in the fairly near future. The study could have major implications on how the Navy designs and builds carriers, the sources agreed.
The study will also have to account for knock-on effects on the work shipbuilders would get in the future, which is always a politically-charged issue. For decades, Newport News in Virginia — now owned by Huntington Ingalls Industries — has been the only shipyard in the world capable of constructing a nuclear-powered supercarrier. The yard is currently under contract for the four new Ford-class carriers, worth tens of billions of dollars, which are slated to enter the fleet in the coming decade.

The Future Carrier 2030 Task Force is being put together by Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly, who expects a report back in about 180 days.

Modly’s task force study, however, will run in parallel with work already being done on the Navy’s future force structure by Deputy Defense Secretary David Norquist. Sec. Esper recently ordered his deputy to review both the Navy’s 30 year shipbuilding plan and its highly-anticipated modernization plan after Esper was unsatisfied with the plans the Navy offered him. The secretary said last week in a letter to the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee he expects the relook to wrap up by summer.
These two parallel — and to some extent competing — studies make Modly’s timeline tricky. His task force won’t wrap up until after the Pentagon’s reviews are done, and Modly will likely have left the secretary’s chair. The White House nominated Amb. Kenneth Braithwaite to be Navy Secretary last week, but it’s unclear when his confirmation hearing will be held.
Modly hinted at his study this morning during testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee. “We have a duty to look at what will come after the Ford,” he said, adding that the Navy has “some breathing room” before having to decide what comes after that last Ford is built in 2032.

Modly’s testimony, taken with similar recent comments about capping the Ford carriers at four before moving in a new direction, could signal a major shift in the Navy’s thinking. “I don’t know if we’re going to buy any more of that type,” Modly said in an interview published on March 4. “We’re certainly thinking about possible other classes. What are we going to learn on these four that’s going to inform what we do next?”
Back in January, he voiced similar concerns with the size and design of the current carrier fleet at a Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments event. “The big question, I think at the top of the list, is the carrier and what’s the future going to look like…I think we agree with a lot of conclusions that [carriers are] more vulnerable.”
For decades, American aircraft carrier strike groups, led by massive big decks bristling with fighter planes and surveillance aircraft, have been the key to US power projection.
But with new generations of long-range precision weapons that can smack into a carrier from well beyond the horizon, military planners have started rethinking the risks of putting a 100,000-ton supercarrier anywhere near a contested coastline.
“The Navy is realizing they need to change that approach and perhaps think about using carriers in more peripheral ways in a fight,” Bryan Clark, senior fellow at Hudson Institute, said. Instead of launching aircraft for strike missions deep inland, as they’ve been used in Iraq and Afghanistan, they’re more likely to “hang out out of range and do sea control,” covering down on large swaths of ocean.

In February, the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower performed just such a mission, sweeping a path across the Atlantic for cargo ships full of Army equipment bound for major ground exercise in Europe. The expercise, run under the newly reconstituted 2nd Fleet, was the first drill simulating a contested crossing of the Atlantic since 1986.
The Ike, along with an unidentified submarine sweeping the depths of the ocean for unexpected Russian guests, sailed well ahead of the convoy while fighting off simulated electronic warfare and undersea and aerial attacks in a stress test for how prepared the Navy is to punch its way across the Atlantic.
As the Pentagon and Navy hash out what the Navy of the future should look like to meet challenges posed by China, they are experimenting everywhere. Navy and Marine Corps leadership have warmed to the “lightning carrier” concept, designed to pack amphibious ships with Marine Corps’ F-35Bs and sail them to the hotspots to cover places the big decks aren’t.

Late last year, the USS America photographed in the Pacific with 13 F-35s on its deck, something the services want to do more of as the so-called Gator Navy reinforces more decks to handle the fifth generation fighter. The Marines and Navy are working on a new strategy to more closely align their operations, which would allow both to provide more punch, and give the Marines the ability to launch from both ships and from small ad-hoc land bases to support the fleet.
Any potentially smaller carrier of the future will not be as small as an amphibious ship, as those ships can’t support high sortie rates over long periods of time like a Nimitz or Ford carrier. They would, however, certainly be smaller than the hulking Fords.
Before the carrier fleet can be reshaped, however, the Navy and secretary Esper need to agree on a new modernization plan and a new shipbuilding plan. Those will come along with what is likely to be a new Navy secretary and then taken up with Congress, which has already mandated the Navy have a 12 carriers, a requirement the 11-carrier fleet has been unable to meet.


Moi je verrai bien une sorte de porte-avions sous-marin transportant des drones. Et je ne plaisante meme pas. Ou alors des drones sous-marins autonomes.
 
Dernière édition:
Breizh In China

Breizh In China

Alpha & Oméga
05 Nov 2009
4 940
2 289
178
Xuijiahui Shanghai
Vous avez raisons, et c'est pour cela que nous connaissons leur existence, pour dissuader.

Je pense que beaucoup d'armement next gen sont tenu au secret et les US ont je pense une avance confortable la dedans. Pourquoi ? Parce qu'il vendent et font des guerres.

Lors de l'assassinat de Ben Laden, l'un des Blackhawk qui transportais les seal c'est crashé dans le jardin de la maison de Ben Laden, les témoins ont raconté qu'ils n'ont entendu que le crash. Les pièces du Blackhawk détruit on donné des spéculations quand à sont design dans les deux films parus sur cet opération, mais une chose est sur, ces hélicoptères étaient équipés de matériels qui les rendaient silencieux. Et cela a été une sacré nouvelle pour les autres armées.
Et ils ont un historique de bond technologique garder secret un bon moment : B-2, blackbird A-12 pour la CIA, satellite keyholes, etc.

Ils ont >50 milliards $ de budget annuel dans les blacks programmes divers et variés.

Ils ont bien évidemment des cartes dans leurs manches, qu’ils ne dévoilent pas pour ne pas relancer la course aux armements inutilement et pour avoir concrètement un avantage tactique comme dans ton exemple.
 
G

guillaumeenchine

Membre Platinum
09 Sept 2019
1 287
227
73
45
Je me rapelle avoir lu un article interessant sur les navires de guerres a l'horizon 2050. Je met le lien.

 
G

guillaumeenchine

Membre Platinum
09 Sept 2019
1 287
227
73
45
Et ils ont un historique de bond technologique garder secret un bon moment : B-2, blackbird A-12 pour la CIA, satellite keyholes, etc.

Ils ont >50 milliards $ de budget annuel dans les blacks programmes divers et variés.

Ils ont bien évidemment des cartes dans leurs manches, qu’ils ne dévoilent pas pour ne pas relancer la course aux armements inutilement et pour avoir concrètement un avantage tactique comme dans ton exemple.

Le hack russe de Facebook lors de l'election americaine de 2016 a fait plus de mal aux Etats-Unis que n'importe qu'elle bombe nucleaire. Et ca a coute peanuts...
 
G

guillaumeenchine

Membre Platinum
09 Sept 2019
1 287
227
73
45
Les missiles modernes sont capables d'aneantir des satelites qui se deplacent a 10 000 kmh alors ton porte-avion qui fait du 56 kmh...
 
G

guillaumeenchine

Membre Platinum
09 Sept 2019
1 287
227
73
45
Mais un satellite à une trajectoire tout ce qu’il y a de plus prévisible.

Un porte-avion aussi. Il flotte a la surface de l'eau donc ne se deplace que dans 2 dimensions a une vitesse d'escargot. 56 kmh c'est meme pas la vitesse d'une twingo.
 
Naxshe

Naxshe

Dieu Supérieur
05 Jan 2016
1 178
632
138
31
Un porte-avion aussi. Il flotte a la surface de l'eau donc ne se deplace que dans 2 dimensions a une vitesse d'escargot. 56 kmh c'est meme pas la vitesse d'une twingo.
Le porte avion est avec une flottille, dont des bateaux spécialisés pour contrer les missiles. Brouilleurs, missile d'interceptions, CIWS. Les avions sont également une défense.
 
lafoy-china

lafoy-china

Modo en rolls
Membre du personnel
08 Mar 2009
16 096
8 348
198
Hong-Kong - Dongguan - Beijing - Paris -
La quatrième marine chinoise. La flotte marchande de Pékin par Gregory Bouvet Spécialiste des questions de défense.
2 octobre 2020

Force d’appoint historique de la marine de l’Armée populaire de libération (APL), la flotte marchande chinoise assure encore ce rôle de nos jours. L’évolution de la stratégie maritime et les récentes réformes au sein de l’appareil militaire chinois ont du reste amélioré la structuration des missions et des capacités. Alors que les gardes-côtes et la milice navale sont couramment qualifiés de deuxième et troisième marine (1) de la République populaire de Chine (RPC), la flotte marchande peut légitimement recevoir le titre de « quatrième marine ».

Extrait :
À l’instar de la marine de l’APL, la flotte marchande chinoise a connu une expansion constante ces dernières décennies, se hissant du 18e rang mondial en 1976 au 3e en 2019 (2). D’après les dernières données de la Conférence des Nations unies sur le commerce et le développement (CNUCED), près de 4 000 navires marchands de plus de 1 000 tonneaux sont la propriété d’armateurs chinois et naviguent sous pavillon national. La législation en vigueur (3) impose que ces navires soient servis par des équipages chinois. Parmi la multitude d’armateurs, deux géants sortent du lot : COSCO Shipping et China Merchants Group (CMG) (4). Ces deux conglomérats font partie des 97 entreprises d’État sous contrôle de la Commission d’administration et de supervision des actifs publics (SASAC (5)), elle-même répondant directement au gouvernement central, le Conseil des affaires de l’État. Selon son site internet, COSCO Shipping possédait au 31 octobre 2019 une flotte de 1 297 navires. Les activités des deux groupes ne se limitent pas seulement au transport maritime, des filiales étant présentes dans le domaine de la construction et réparation navale ou dans la gestion de terminaux portuaires.

Avec 80 % de ses importations pétrolières et 60 % de son commerce en valeur transitant par la mer (6), le transport maritime revêt donc une importance majeure pour la RPC. Le volet maritime du projet de nouvelles routes de la soie (OBOR – One Belt, One Road) lancé en 2013 accentue encore cette dépendance aux voies de communication océaniques. Depuis 2008, les livres blancs de la défense ont réitéré la nécessité de protection des intérêts outre-mer. Le dernier en date, publié en juillet 2019, rappelle que deux des objectifs de la défense nationale chinoise sont de « protéger les droits et intérêts maritimes de la Chine » ainsi que de « protéger ses intérêts outre-mer ».

Suite de l'analyse >>>


Anecdote : A l'instar des appareils civils sovietiques des compagnies aeriennes du bloc de l'Est dans les annees 50/60 /70 adaptes pour une utilisation militaire en cas de conflit ! Coupoles de nez vitrees sur certains et autres equipements adaptables ou modulables ...

Lien : Il est difficile de s'y retrouver dans les avions russes d'autant plus que les avions civils sont utilisés aussi à des fins militaires.
 
Dernière édition:
G

guillaumeenchine

Membre Platinum
09 Sept 2019
1 287
227
73
45
Le porte avion est avec une flottille, dont des bateaux spécialisés pour contrer les missiles. Brouilleurs, missile d'interceptions, CIWS. Les avions sont également une défense.

Pfff on est en 2020. Les Allemands ont invente le blitzgrieg en 1940 et tu me parles de gagner une guerre avec des portes-avions? Pourquoi pas des dirigeables aussi? La guerre en 2020 c'est des drones, des sous-marins, des satelites, drs missiles, etc. Surement pas des bateaux de 100 000 tonnes qui font du 50 kmh.
 
lafoy-china

lafoy-china

Modo en rolls
Membre du personnel
08 Mar 2009
16 096
8 348
198
Hong-Kong - Dongguan - Beijing - Paris -
Esper appelle à une marine de 500 navires pour contrer la Chine Par Jon Harper
10/6/2020

La marine américaine aura besoin de plus de 500 navires dans sa flotte pour assurer sa supériorité maritime sur la Chine dans les prochaines décennies, a déclaré le secrétaire à la défense Mark Esper le 6 octobre.

Extrait :
Cette conclusion est basée sur l'étude très attendue sur les futures forces navales, dirigée par le secrétaire adjoint à la défense David Norquist, qui a été récemment remise à Esper.

"Le Parti communiste chinois ... a l'intention d'achever la modernisation de ses forces armées d'ici 2035 et de mettre en place une armée de classe mondiale d'ici 2049", a déclaré M. Esper lors d'une allocution au Centre d'évaluation stratégique et budgétaire à Washington, D.C. "À ce moment, Pékin veut atteindre la parité avec la marine américaine, voire dépasser nos capacités dans certains domaines et compenser notre surclassement dans plusieurs autres".

L'étude sur la force navale du Pentagone, récemment achevée, a évalué une série d'options pour la future flotte, conçues pour maintenir la surenchère des États-Unis dans une ère de concurrence entre les grandes puissances pendant de longues années, a-t-il déclaré. La marine, le corps des Marines, l'état-major interarmées, le bureau du secrétaire à la défense, ainsi que des conseillers extérieurs ont aidé à mener une "évaluation complète, limitée en termes de coûts et tenant compte des menaces", alignée sur la stratégie de défense nationale, a-t-il dit. M. Esper a baptisé sa vision de la future flotte "Force de combat 2045".

Le groupe d'étude a examiné plusieurs options de forces en utilisant la modélisation et le wargaming pour analyser les forces et les faiblesses de chaque combinaison de navires par rapport à différents scénarios de missions futures.

"Battle Force 2045 appelle à une marine plus équilibrée de plus de 500 navires avec et sans équipage", a déclaré M. Esper. "De plus, nous atteindrons 355 navires de la force de combat traditionnelle avant 2035 - le moment où la [République populaire de Chine] vise à moderniser complètement son armée. Et surtout, nous avons maintenant une voie crédible pour atteindre plus de 355 navires [avec équipage] dans une ère de contraintes budgétaires".

La flotte de sous-marins est la première priorité, a déclaré M. Esper. Cela inclut l'achat de sous-marins de missiles balistiques de classe Columbia pour moderniser la partie maritime de la dissuasion nucléaire du pays, ainsi que davantage de sous-marins d'attaque de classe Virginia. La marine a besoin de 70 à 80 sous-marins d'attaque, a-t-il ajouté, les qualifiant de plate-forme d'attaque la plus apte à survivre dans un futur conflit entre grandes puissances.

"Si nous ne faisons rien d'autre, la marine doit commencer à construire trois sous-marins de classe Virginia par an dès que possible", a-t-il déclaré.

Les porte-avions sont actuellement les joyaux de la couronne de la marine, bien que certains observateurs aient suggéré qu'ils deviennent de plus en plus vulnérables aux missiles à longue portée guidés avec précision.

"Les porte-avions à propulsion nucléaire resteront notre moyen de dissuasion le plus visible, avec la capacité de projeter les forces et d'exécuter des missions de contrôle en mer à travers le monde", a déclaré M. Esper. "Pour continuer à améliorer leur capacité de survie et leur létalité, nous développons les forces aérienne du futur capable de s'engager à des portées étendues." Les forces aériennes devraient inclure une variété de plateformes sans pilote, y compris des chasseurs, des ravitailleurs, des avions d'alerte rapide et d'attaque électronique, a-t-il ajouté.

Suite de l'analyse en anglais >>>

7 octobre 2020
 
Dernière édition: